Gen Z: Connect with Your Elders by Learning These Boomer Slang Terms

Older folks have made an effort over the years to attempt to comprehend the latest slang that kids are using.  So let’s turn the tables, and teach the kids the hip lingo that Boomers added to the lexicon.

MentalFloss.com compiled a list of 26 “boomer slang terms” you should know.  Here are the highlights:

1.  Jonesing (Jonesin’) . . . or “a physical craving for any addictive substance.”  It’s been used for drugs . . . but it could be anything, even Necco Wafers.  (???)

2.  Aggro . . . which is “short for aggressive.”

3.  Zilch . . . basically, “zero.”  When someone has no job, relationship, or moneymaking prospects, Boomers might say they “have zilch going on.”

4.  Zonked Out . . . or “out of commission.”  Anyone who was flat on their back due to fatigue, drinking, drugs, or just plain boredom was said to be “zonked.”

5.  Wannabe . . . which is like Gen X’s “poser.”  A noun or adjective to chastise someone for aspiring to be something other than who they were.

6.  Mellow (and Harsh One’s Mellow) . . . or “chill.”  Anyone loose and relaxed was said to be “mellow.”  And “harshing” it was intruding on that vibe.

7.  Wig Out . . . which is “to lose one’s composure.”  The word “wig” became synonymous with “mind.”  There was even the phrase “blowing one’s wig” for getting upset . . . but that even pre-dates many Boomers.

8.  Brewski . . . or beer, of course.  “Boomers on college campuses in the ’70s referred to their precious cans of beer as ‘brewskis.'”

9.  Leaf Peeper . . . not to be confused with “Peeping Tom.”  New England Boomers apparently used this phrase to describe tourists who come around during the fall to enjoy the seasonal colors.  (???)

10.  Granny Glasses . . . which some Boomers may now be WEARING.  In the ’60s, this was used for any “oversized, pointy, or out-of-fashion spectacles.”

(MentalFloss.com has more Boomer slang, including:  “Yuppiedom” . . . “peace out” . . . “yikes” . . . “male chauvinist pig” . . . “‘roid rage” . . . and “knuckle sandwich.”)